Lady of Vladimir

Lady of Vladimir

    The miraculous icon of Vladimir is one of Russia's most famous icons and its connection to the Russian people dates back to its beginnings.
    According to one tradition, it is one of the images of the evangelist Luke, who was in Jerusalem until 450. Then it was transferred to Constantinople and Patriarch Luke of Chrysovergi offered it as a gift to the ruler Yuri Vladimirovic Dolgokruki. He placed it on the women's monastery of Visegrad.
    In 1155 Prince Andrei Vogobulski transferred the icon to Vladimir, where he built a magnificent temple dedicated to the Dormition of the Virgin of Vladimir to host this precious and magnificent icon.
    The icon of the Virgin remained in Vladimir for three centuries. Throughout this time, the icon of Virgin Mary has not stopped listening to and helping those who invoke her help. The icon has performed many miracles, including incidents such as remaining untouched by a fire that burned the cathedral, escaped the looting from the Tartars, and accompanied Prince Andrew in the battles he gave to Volga against the Bulgarians and many other more.
    But the picture worked miraculously in other critical moments. For example, when the terrible Timur Lenk attacked Moscow in 1395, prince Basil Dimitrievic and the Metropolitan Cyprian took the icon in safe place, requesting the city to be saved from the attack. The litany lasted 10 days and on 26th of  August 1395, thousands of people welcomed and placed the icon back in the cathedral of the Dormition of the Virgin of Vladimir. At the same time, Timur slept on his tent and saw a terrible dream, where many high priests descended from a great mountain holding gold bars, and above them a woman wrapped in a shield of light. Around her countless angels held burning swords. Suddenly they rushed against him. Waking up terrified, he asked the counsellors what this was about. They told him that she was the protector of the Russians, the Virgin of the Christians. Timur immediately decided to step back and retreat.
    Also, this picture is attributed to the victories of the Russians against the Tatars in the 15th century. In 1480 the picture was finally transferred to Moscow. In 1918 the Soviet government undertook the maintenance of the image, cleaning up the four coats that had been added from above. Thus, its original form appeared again. It then moved to Moscow's History Museum and from there to Tretyakov Gallery, where it is still in a chapel up to today.

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